New Advanced Degree Programs at UH Law School Open to Foreign and U.S. Attorneys

The University of Hawai‘i Law School has established two new programs in advanced legal studies aimed at foreign-trained attorneys as well as U.S. attorneys hoping to spend time in further legal study, especially those who want to teach law outside the U.S.

UH Law Dean Avi Soifer noted that the advanced degree programs could be particularly attractive to East-West Center alumni and grantees interested in broadening their career paths.

The AJD – Advanced or Accelerated Juris Doctor – program offers advanced standing to foreign-trained applicants, and allows them to earn the JD degree in as little as two years of study rather than three, with the option of taking a U.S. bar exam after graduating and being admitted to practice in the United States.

The SJD – Doctor of Juridical Science – program is primarily intended for those who have completed a JD or an LLM program and who already teach, or are preparing to teach, law outside the United States. It is also designed for those involved in policy work in research institutes and government organizations.

These two new advanced law programs complement  Richardson Law School’s existing LLM program, launched in 2003, which has already attracted 143 attorneys from 52 countries, and was recently recognized as one of the best in the nation in three categories by The International Jurist magazine.

“The diversity of our Law School offers a nurturing atmosphere for students and scholars coming to the East-West Center,” Soifer said, adding: “We were pleased to be very highly ranked recently in terms of our career support as well as for our academics. These new programs offer attractive options for those who thrive while working in a diverse academic community.”

Applications are currently being accepted. Click here for more information.

AJD program in a nutshell:

  • Provides an option for foreign-trained attorneys who want to be grounded in American law, and then have the option of practicing law in the United States.
  • Foreign-trained attorneys may receive up to a year’s credit toward a JD for their foreign training.
  • The degree enables foreign attorneys to take a U.S. bar exam and practice anywhere in the U.S.

SJD program in a nutshell:

  • Students who have completed either a JD or LLM may apply for this advanced degree.
  • Offers an important credential for those who hope to teach law outside the U.S. for both foreign-trained attorneys and American citizens.
  • Requires just a year in residence at Richardson, with the expectation that the dissertation will be completed in three years.
  • Offers time for advanced legal research or research on policy issues.

East-West Center Association Alumni Scholars for 2014-2015

L to R:  Yuki Asahina (Japan), Yilong Liu (China), Sadie Green (USA), Ned Shultz (EWCA President), Jonathan Valdez (USA)

L to R: Yuki Asahina (Japan), Yilong Liu (China), Sadie Green (USA), Ned Shultz (EWCA President), Jonathan Valdez (USA)

EWCA Alumni Scholars shown above with Dr. Ned Shultz, EWCA President, participated in the May Ho’opuka Ceremony, a celebration honoring the students completing their awards with the East-West Center.

EWCA scholarship recipients for 2014-2015 were:
Yuki Asahina (Japan)
Sadie Green (USA)
Melia Kamakawiwoole Iwamoto (USA)
Yilong Liu (China)
Kathryn Metzker (USA)
Elita Ouk (Cambodia)
Susanthi Medha Kumari Sabhapathi Mudiyanselage (Sri Lanka)
Jonathan Valdez (USA)
Nicole Holulani Yamase (USA)

2015 East-West Center Association/EWCA Hawaii Chapter Travel Grant Recipients

L to R:  Matthew Kelty (USA), Yi-Chieh Lai (Taiwan), Ned Shultz (EWCA President), Alex Holowicki (USA)

L to R: Matthew Kelty (USA), Yi-Chieh Lai (Taiwan), Ned Shultz (EWCA President), Alex Holowicki (USA)

The East-West Center Association (EWCA) and the EWCA Hawaii Chapter each year offer several summer travel grants ($500 each) to current EWC students. The grant is used towards presenting a conference paper, taking part in internships, conducting field research, or studying in summer institutes.

This year, ten travel grants were awarded to:
Ngu Njei Abanda (Cameroon)
Asutoshi, Das (India)
Alex Holowicki (USA)
Matthew Kelty (USA)
Obadia Mfuh Kenji (Cameroon)
Syed Shurid Khan (Bangladesh)
Yi-Chieh Lai (Taiwan)
Charmaine Ledesma (Guam)
Elita Ouk (Cambodia)
Sayaka Sakuma (Okinawa)

Southeast Asia Youth Leadership Program on Shaping Sustainable Schools and Communities Sows Bumper Crop of Green Action Follow-on Projects

See what sprouted when youth from Southeast Asia came to the United States to learn about leadership, civic engagement, and local sustainability through the lens of “green schools.” Since returning home, the participants have channeled their learning and experiences into positive community action to promote green practices.

SEAYLP-Group-Photo_crop_WEBIn the fall of 2012, the East-WestCenter launched Leading Green: Shaping Sustainable Schools and Communities, a Southeast Asia Youth Leadership Program (SEAYLP) sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. To date, EWC has coordinated two exchanges in the United States for 61 youth and educators from the ten member states of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The three-week-long exchanges offered took place in schools and communities in Hawai‘i; the San Francisco Bay Area; Washington, DC; and surrounding communities in Virginia.

new compressed pictureThrough hands-on activities focusing on civic education, leadership, diversity, and community engagement, the program provided opportunities for participants to interact with diverse Americans as they examined, through the lens of “green and sustainable schools and communities,” the principles of democracy and civil society. They also created Green Action Projects, described below and on the project website, which they have been implementing since their return home. By focusing on schools and their immediate community, participants have been able to practice leadership as they engage their peers and undertake positive community action to enhance their everyday environment.

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Joining Hands to Combat Human Trafficking in the Asia-Pacific

By APLP Fellows Loan T. Le from Vietnam and Amir Ramin from Afghanistan

(EWC Alumna Tin Myaing Thein, Executive Director of the Pacific Gateway Center, speaks about the problem of human trafficking. Immigration attorney Grace Michiko Nowicki (R) addressed the related legal issues.)

HONOLULU – On November 14, six fellows from the East-West Center’s Asia-Pacific Leadership Program (APLP), collaborated with the Pacific and Asian Affairs Council (PAAC) and the Pacific Gateway Center (PGC) in hosting the event, “Human Trafficking in Asia and the Pacific: Current Challenges and Future Prospects.” It was held at the Pacific Gateway Center’s headquarters in the Lemongrass Café in downtown Honolulu.
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Seeing America through the Eye of Hurricane Sandy

EWC international fellows take home lessons from the storm

Christina Monroe, EWC Education Project Specialist & Asia Pacific Leadership Program alumna

(APLP fellows in NYC during Hurricane Sandy witness resilience of the American people.)

It seemed the worst place to be on Oct 29th, but for fellows trying to understand America, New York City was the perfect spot.
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